Targeted poker quiz 29: Omaha-8 (advanced)


Note: Not at the old Poker1 site. This 39-part series of quizzes, originally published (2004-2006) in Poker Player, is based on the Mike Caro University of Poker library of research and advice. In each entry, Mike Caro presents 10 questions covering a category of poker, targeted for beginner, intermediate, or advanced players. Answers with explanations appear below each quiz, with the questions repeated for easy reference.


The MCU Targeted Poker Quiz series

(See the index to this series)

Omaha-8 (level: advanced)

  1. In Omaha, eight-or-better high-low – as well as any variation of high-low poker – which statement is true?

    (a) Any hand that begins with predominantly high-side prospects is never profitable, no matter how many opponents compete;

    (b) The more players enter the pot, the less necessary it is to try to scoop (win both the high and low sides);

    (c) You can play more than twice as many hands profitably than you can in hold ’em;

    (d) You should never raise from an early position unless you have a hand that ranks in the top one percent of profit-makers.

  2. Against just one opponent, which is the most profitable hand in Omaha, eight-or-better?

    (a) Kc Kd Jc Jd;

    (b) 7c 6c 5d 2c;

    (c) 10h 9h 8c 7c;

    (d) As Ac Qh 9d.

  3. In Omaha, eight-or-better, three aces and a deuce of four different suits is a favorite against an opposing random hand, if played to the showdown.

    (a) true;

    (b) false.

  4. In Omaha, eight-or-better, three aces and a deuce of four different suits will win more than its fair share against two opposing random hands, if played to the showdown.

    (a) true;

    (b) false.

  5. In Omaha, eight-or-better, three aces and a deuce of four different suits will win more than its fair share against eight opposing random hands, if played to the showdown.

    (a) true;

    (b) false.

  6. In Omaha, eight-or-better, Hand A is Ac 2c 3h 4h and Hand B is Kc Kd 5s Ad. The board is 2h 4c 9c 10h, with just the river card coming, followed by a showdown. What percent of the time will Hand A scoop both sides of the pot?

    (a) 15;

    (b) 25;

    (c) 55

    (d) 80.

  7. In Omaha, eight-or-better, if two players begin with A-2-3-4 of matching suits, one player having clubs, the other diamonds, what percent of the time will the pot be scooped?

    (a) 6;

    (b) 15;

    (c) 35;

    (d) 50.

  8. While it’s always a good idea to play quality hands with an excellent chance of competing for low and, perhaps, stumbling into a high hand, doing so is even more important when there are many opponents competing for an Omaha, eight-or-better pot.

    (a) true;

    (b) false

  9. In Omaha, eight-or-better, if you begin with Ac 2d 3h 4s and are all-in, how often will you have qualified for low after the final “river” card?

    (a) 80 percent of the time;

    (b) 90 percent of the time;

    (c) about half the time;

    (d) none of the above is within 10 percentage points of being true.

  10. Scooping a pot with seven-way action in an Omaha, eight-or-better game is usually…

    (a) almost impossible;

    (b) almost twice as profitable as winning the low end alone;

    (c) exactly twice as profitable as winning the high end alone;

    (d) more than twice as profitable as winning either the high or low end


Answers and explanations (with questions repeated for convenience)

Omaha-8 (level: advanced)

  1. In Omaha, eight-or-better high-low – as well as any variation of high-low poker – which statement is true?

    (a) Any hand that begins with predominantly high-side prospects is never profitable, no matter how many opponents compete;

    (b) The more players enter the pot, the less necessary it is to try to scoop (win both the high and low sides);

    (c) You can play more than twice as many hands profitably than you can in hold ’em;

    (d) You should never raise from an early position unless you have a hand that ranks in the top one percent of profit-makers.

    Answer: (b) In Omaha high-low split, the more players enter the pot, the less necessary it is to try to win both the high and low sides (scoop). But even though it’s “less necessary,” you should still try to play hands with excellent scoop possibilities as much as possible.

  2. Against just one opponent, which is the most profitable hand in Omaha, eight-or-better?

    (a) Kc Kd Jc Jd;

    (b) 7c 6c 5d 2c;

    (c) 10h 9h 8c 7c;

    (d) As Ac Qh 9d.

    Answer: (a) Against a single opponent, Kc Kd Jc Jd is more profitable than 7c 6c 5d 2c, 10h 9h, 8c 7c, or As Ac Qh 9d.

  3. In Omaha, eight-or-better, three aces and a deuce of four different suits is a favorite against an opposing random hand, if played to the showdown.

    (a) true;

    (b) false.

    Answer: (a) It’s true that, if played to the showdown against a single opponent, A-A-A-2 is a favorite against a random opposing hand.

  4. In Omaha, eight-or-better, three aces and a deuce of four different suits will win more than its fair share against two opposing random hands, if played to the showdown.

    (a) true;

    (b) false.

    Answer: (a) It’s also true that A-A-A-2 of four different suits will win more than its fair share against two opposing random hands, if played to the showdown.

  5. In Omaha, eight-or-better, three aces and a deuce of four different suits will win more than its fair share against eight opposing random hands, if played to the showdown.

    (a) true;

    (b) false.

    Answer (a) It’s even true that A-A-A-2 of four different suits will win more than its fair share against eight opposing random hands, if played to the showdown! (This doesn’t mean you should play the hand, however, because it isn’t profitable when the likely betting is factored in.)

  6. In Omaha, eight-or-better, Hand A is Ac 2c 3h 4h and Hand B is Kc Kd 5s Ad. The board is 2h 4c 9c 10h, with just the river card coming, followed by a showdown. What percent of the time will Hand A scoop both sides of the pot?

    (a) 15;

    (b) 25;

    (c) 55

    (d) 80.

    Answer: (d) If Hand A is Ac 2c 3h 4h and Hand B is Kc Kd 5s Ad with a board of 2h 4c 9c 10h and just the final card to fall, followed by a showdown, then hand A will scoop both sides of the pot 80 percent of the time.

  7. In Omaha, eight-or-better, if two players begin with A-2-3-4 of matching suits, one player having clubs, the other diamonds, what percent of the time will the pot be scooped?

    (a) 6;

    (b) 15;

    (c) 35;

    (d) 50.

    Answer: (a) If two players begin an Omaha eight-or-better hand with A-2-3-4 of matching suits (one in clubs, one in diamonds), the pot will be scooped 6 percent of the time. The other 94 percent constitutes ties. Remember, one suited card on the board won’t win – you need three, using two of the four suited cards in your hand. Additionally, if one of those suited board cards is in the five-to-eight range, that might help an opponent split the low side – and if two or more are in that range, the opponent will split the low side.

  8. While it’s always a good idea to play quality hands with an excellent chance of competing for low and, perhaps, stumbling into a high hand, doing so is even more important when there are many opponents competing for an Omaha, eight-or-better pot.

    (a) true;

    (b) false.

    Answer: (b) You should try to play quality hands with an excellent chance of competing for low and, perhaps, stumbling into a high hand. But it’s false to say that it is even more important to do so when there are many opponents competing, because you can sometimes make a nice profit against many opponents by winning only one side. That concept isn’t always true, though. Heads-up, a high-only hand can often be profitable, for instance. And against many opponents who have good chances of scooping, a one-way hand is seldom profitable.

  9. In Omaha, eight-or-better, if you begin with Ac 2d 3h 4s and are all-in, how often will you have qualified for low after the final “river” card?

    (a) 80 percent of the time;

    (b) 90 percent of the time;

    (c) about half the time;

    (d) none of the above is within 10 percentage points of being true.

    Answer: (c) In Omaha, eight-or-better, if you begin with Ac 2d 3h 4s and are all-in, you will qualify for low at the showdown about half the time.

  10. Scooping a pot with seven-way action in an Omaha, eight-or-better game is usually…

    (a) almost impossible;

    (b) almost twice as profitable as winning the low end alone;

    (c) exactly twice as profitable as winning the high end alone;

    (d) more than twice as profitable as winning either the high or low end.

    Answer: (d) Scooping a pot with seven-way action in Omaha, eight-or-better game is more than twice as profitable as winning either the high or low end.


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4 thoughts on “Targeted poker quiz 29: Omaha-8 (advanced)”

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  1. The explanation for Question 7 is incorrect. It says “if two or more are in that range, the opponent will split the low side.” A board of 67JQK with the three flush will not be split. You need more than just two cards in the five-to-eight range for there to be a low, you need a third unique card less than or equal to eight.

    1. Tom, I believe you have misread the answer, here’s the whole thing:

      “Answer: (a) If two players begin an Omaha eight-or-better hand with A-2-3-4 of matching suits (one in clubs, one in diamonds), the pot will be scooped 6 percent of the time. The other 94 percent constitutes ties. Remember, one suited card on the board won’t win – you need three, using two of the four suited cards in your hand. Additionally, if one of those suited board cards is in the five-to-eight range, that might help an opponent split the low side – and if two or more are in that range, the opponent will split the low side.”

      —————————————-
      “…if two or more are in that range” refers to the set of at least three suited cards on the board. I think it was worded in a somewhat confusing way, possibly for brevity’s sake, but it is correct, as far as I can see.

      Lis-
      Lis-

    1. Thanks, Sheryl.

      I fixed the letters and added the correction notice to the change log (linked to on the home page). I gave you credit for reporting this — and we greatly appreciate it whenever anyone reports glitches at Poker1.

      Straight Flushes,
      Mike Caro

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